CBC Radio: Why Low-Wage Workers Are Being Left Out of the Sexual Harassment Conversation

In an interview with CBC Radio, EHRP founder Barbara Ehrenreich worries that the uproar over sexual harassment in the workplace has yet to be heard in low-wage industries.

Worker Abuse Is Rampant, and Sexual Harassment Is Just the Start, Ehrenreich Tells Slate

While reporting her landmark book Nickel and Dimed, EHRP's founder routinely fended off sexual harassment. "A waitress," she recalls, "has to be prepared basically all the time to hear remarks on her body." Read the full interview in Slate here.

EHRP Announces Fund for Reporters Axed by DNAinfo and Gothamist

ATTENTION EX-DNAINFO, GOTHAMIST JOURNALISTS: Barbara Ehrenreich’s Economic Hardship Reporting Project (EHRP) “has established a $5,000 fund to assign feature-length articles to three reporters” hailing from the recently shuttered sites. “This is the least we can do to support journalists who have been suddenly deprived of their livelihoods by the capricious actions of an anti-labor billionaire,” Ehrenreich said in a statement. Apply here.

Economic Hardship Reporting Project Appoints David Wallis Managing Director

NEW YORK, NY (PRWEB) AUGUST 28, 2017

The Economic Hardship Reporting Project (EHRP), the nonprofit organization founded by Barbara Ehrenreich to fund journalism about inequality in America, announced the appointment of David Wallis as managing director. Wallis will work with executive editor Alissa Quart to direct EHRP operations and initiatives, and help the five-year-old organization continue to build sustained capacity.

EHRP works with top-flight media outlets to co-publish stories by independent journalists about poverty and economic struggle, topics often given short shrift by mainstream media.
“The Economic Hardship Reporting Project steps into the breach created by rapid media consolidation, enabling many independent journalists to do critical work,” Wallis said. “It’s an honor to contribute to what Barbara and Alissa are building.”

Previously Wallis served as opinion editor of Forward and deputy editor of The New York Observer. Wallis has contributed to The New Yorker, Slate, The Washington Post and The New York Times, edited two critically acclaimed books, Killed: Great Journalism Too Hot To Print (Nation Books, 2004) and Killed Cartoons: Casualties from the War on Free Expression (W.W. Norton, 2007). In 2000, he founded Featurewell.com, an online syndication services that pays the majority of proceeds to contributors. In 2007, he was a plaintiff, in Martinez-Alequin et al v. The City of New York et al, a historic First Amendment lawsuit, which forced New York City to reform its press credentialing process, which previously discriminated against online journalists.
“EHRP has already made a real difference in how inequality is reported in America,” said Quart. “David will now bring our organization to an even higher level.”

About The Economic Hardship Reporting Project
The Economic Hardship Reporting Project aims to change the national conversation around both poverty and economic insecurity. The stories EHRP commissions — from narrative features to photo essays and video — put a human face on financial instability. EHRP funds and places reportage and photojournalism with news sites and magazines including The New York Times, NBC News, Politico, The Verge, Vox, Vogue, The Atlantic, The New Yorker, The Arkansas Times and many others.

Economic Hardship Reporting Project Earns LA Press Club Awards

NEW YORK, NY (PRWEB) AUGUST 24, 2017

The Economic Hardship Reporting Project, (EHRP), the nonprofit organization founded by Barbara Ehrenreich to fund journalism about growing inequality in America, won three Los Angeles Press Club awards for its collaborations with Capital & Main, announced at the 59th Southern California Journalism Awards.

EHRP won first place for commentary for executive editor Alissa Quart’s column in Capital & Main that was co-published with The Guardian, “Is the Middle Class Being ‘Disrupted’ Into Extinction?”
“Backed with pertinent facts, Alissa Quart’s dystopian opinion suggests an uneasy future for the ‘Middle Precariat,’” said the Club’s judges of Quart’s column.

The article sought to make sense of the many middle-class professions facing constriction in the last decade, most startlingly by robots

EHRP also won two third place awards from the Press Club, in the lifestyle feature and hard news feature categories respectively.

“In a time when the media neglects reporting on social class and ignores labor almost completely, Alissa’s columns cast a bright light on the new, well-founded 'fear of falling' among the upper and lower middle classes,” says EHRP founder Barbara Ehrenreich.

These awards define different poles of what the small but mighty journalism non-profit EHRP has been supporting with grants and editing for five years. The first is to foster innovative writing, analysis and reporting about inequality and ensure these deep, new takes reach the broadest possible audiences. The second is to enable independent journalists to prosper during the continuing contraction of the media industry.

The Los Angeles Press Club is a non-profit organization that supports, promotes and defends quality journalism in Southern California. Capital & Main is an award-winning online publication reporting from California.


About The Economic Hardship Reporting Project
The Economic Hardship Reporting Project aims to change the national conversation around both poverty and economic insecurity. The stories EHRP commissions — from narrative features to photo essays and video — put a human face on financial instability. EHRP funds and places reportage and photojournalism with news sites and magazines including The New York Times, NBC News, Politico, The Verge, Vox, Vogue, The Atlantic, The New Yorker, The Arkansas Times and many others.

How Fusion, The Guardian, & EHRP are changing the coverage of underreported areas, Neiman Lab writes

Equally disturbed by the state of post-election coverage, Alissa Quart, executive editor of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project, and Jessica Reed, features editor at the Guardian U.S., put their heads together. (Here’s more about The Guardian’s initiatives in this area.)
“73 percent of media workers are located between Virginia, New York, Boston and the West Coast. The rest of the country, ‘flyover states,’ has about 27 percent of the country’s media workers,” Quart said, citing statistics from a recent Politico report. “So the question becomes: How do we get these unheard voices amplified?”

The answer is a joint project with Reed, who helps local reporters from flyover states develop longform stories. She is eager to collaborate with their local newsrooms, so that reporters are published both internationally in The Guardian and within their own communities.

“We are really keen to unlock stories that can be read on a micro level in your small town, all the way up to an international level. We think there are tons of topics, like the public land grab that is currently happening in Montana,” she said. “We think these stories merit an international audience and a local audience. So we want to work with local editors without being patronizing. It’s not journalistic tourism, it’s about collaboration.”

 

Read the full article here.

EHRP & The Guardian's "On the Ground" column featured on Neiman Lab

The Guardian is collaborating with the Economic Hardship Reporting Project (a journalism nonprofit founded in 2012 by Barbara Ehrenreich, the author of the bestselling Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, to publish writers from rural areas across the U.S. in collaborations with local newsrooms; this part of the project also includes the development of a database of editors across the country who’d be interested in partnering. The Guardian has hired its first Rust Belt correspondent, Drew Philp. And a new column, Outclassed — written by the Economic Hardship Reporting Project’s executive editor Alissa Quart and neuroscientist Maia Szalavitz — takes on that topic that Americans are uncomfortable talking about: class.

Read more here.