Participatory Budgeting: The People’s Budget
along with the rest of the projects featured in the Design by Community series. Co-published with WNYC Studios. WNYC Studios WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. Residents on Staten Island's North Shore
Episode 2: We've Been Here Before
WNYC Studios elections that followed it, the last “Year of the Woman.” Co-published with WNYC Studios. Help us change WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. Barbara Mikulski and three female senators
Episode 8: 'I Want Someone to Love Me Even for a Second'
WNYC Studios WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. Policy experts even use the term "sexual
Episode 7: 'It’s the Hardest Thing I’ve Ever Done'
WNYC Studios Foundation, the John and Gwen Smart Family Foundation, and the Economic Hardship Reporting Project. Co-published with WNYC Studios. WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. Desperate parents with means can turn to a
Coming Soon: Mass Incarceration Starts Young
Sarah Ballarini Coming Soon: 'Caught: The Lives of Juvenile Justice' The United States locks up more people than any country in the world. That starts young: Roughly a million kids a year get caught up in the criminal justice system. In Caught, a new podcast from WNYC, we'll listen as some of those young people tell their stories over nine episodes. They'll help us understand how we got here--and how we might help, rather than just punish troubled youth. Welcome to Caught: The Lives of Juvenile Justice. Caught: The Lives of Juvenile Justice is supported, in part, by the Anne Levy Fund, Margaret Neubart Foundation, the John and Gwen Smart Family Foundation, and the Economic Hardship Reporting Project. Co-published with WNYC Studios. WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. Roughly a million kids a year get caught up WNYC Studios
Free Summer Stuff: NYC's Public Pools
WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. When it's hot, over 50 free public pools in NYC become a real life saver. WNYC Studios Nicola Free Summer Stuff: NYC's Public Pools As part of WNYC’s Affordability Project, we’re collecting strategies for free summer entertainment. And when it's hot, the over 50 free public pools in New York City become a real life-saver for many residents, especially kids whose parents aren’t spending (or can't afford to spend) big bucks for summer camp. What are some of your other free summer activities? Tweet @WNYC with #affordnyc or comment below. Click on "LISTEN" to hear from kids and adults at one pool in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, on a recent 90 degree day. And good news: The pool season has been extended to September 10th! Co-published with WNYC Studios.
Episode 1: The Dream Was Not Mine
WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. Jennifer Willoughby and Saily Avelenda each ( Tyler Sizemore, Greenwich Time ) Episode 1: The Dream Was Not Mine Jennifer Willoughby was in an abusive marriage. Saily Avelenda was unhappy with her congressman, who'd held office for over two decades without facing a serious contender. They didn’t know they were about to topple two political giants. Plus, want to know the real reason the 2018 midterms could make history? It has to do with a number political scientists call the "gender gap." Note: WNYC made several attempts to reach Rob Porter for comment. He did not respond before this episode was released.  Co-published with WNYC Studios. Help us change the conversation about inequality in America. Donate to EHRP. WNYC Studios
Is the Garment Center Out of Fashion?
dependent on each other they are." Co-published with WNYC Studios. WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. These days, the Garment District is WNYC Studios
C is for Childcare: English Class Offers Free Babysitting Too
WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. A new program in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, is WNYC Studios "Mother to Mother" offers free English classes plus babysitting in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. Andrew Sundberg C is for Childcare: English Class Offers Free Babysitting Too A new program in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, is trying to make it easier for moms who don't speak English to improve their language skills. It's called Mother to Mother, and in this program, both the English lessons and childcare are free. "We found a gap that was in the community where there’s a lot of ESL programs but there’s not anything for mothers who want to bring their children along," said the program's founder Britni Blackketter. Without childcare, many mothers found it difficult to consistently attend ESL programs. For example, student Maria Luna wants to practice writing and speaking before taking the GED at the end of the year, but she couldn't find someone to watch her three-year-old daughter. "I take this class because I can bring her," she said. "Honestly, this is my first time at school." Sarah Wang, co-founder of the program, said it was also the perfect way for her to start teaching again after her son turned one. "The only way I could do it would be if I could bring him with me," she said. "Because he was so young, and because childcare is hard to secure, it’s hard to pay for if you don’t have the income for it." The kids play while volunteer teachers hold class a few feet away. It can be noisy at times, but Wang said the moms are used to it. "There have been many times when Britni or I were teaching a class, pick up the baby and carry her while the mothers are working in groups," she said. Blackketter and Wang hope to expand the program with more enrichment for kids and more English classes for the moms. Co-published with WNYC Studios.
Right of Way: The Battle Over the BQX
its own. And it is: Service is scheduled to be up and running in 2024. Co-published with WNYC Studios. WNYC Studios WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. As the city moves forward with the light
Episode 6: 'Please Lock Up My Kid'
WNYC Studios Louisa Bertman Episode 6: 'Please Lock Up My Status offenses are acts only considered crimes if committed by young people – things like running away, not going to school, or missing curfew. They are designed to keep at risk youth safe, but in practice, they can also become a pipeline into the juvenile justice system for kids who might otherwise not end up there. One of those kids is Maria, a young woman living in Walla Walla, Washington, who refuses to attend school. Washington state intensified its status offense laws after a runaway girl was found dead. It now leads the nation in jailing kids for status offenses. Caught: The Lives of Juvenile Justice is supported, in part, by the Anne Levy Fund, Margaret Neubart Foundation, the John and Gwen Smart Family Foundation, and the Economic Hardship Reporting Project. Co-published with WNYC Studios. WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. Status offenses are designed to keep at
Episode 1: 'I Just Want You to Come Home'
Louisa Bertman Episode 1: Getting Caught Z had his first encounters with law enforcement when he was just 12 years old. Now, at 16, he’s sitting in detention on an armed robbery charge—his young life has been defined by cops and courts. Dwayne Betts is a poet and juvenile justice lawyer who, in his own youth, was deemed a “super-predator,” and spent nine years incarcerated. Both Z and Dwayne were guilty of the crimes for which they were charged; their stories are not whodunits. But together, they introduce the central questions of this podcast: What happens once we decide a child is a criminal? What does society owe those children, beyond punishment? And what are the human consequences of the expansion and hardening of criminal justice policies that began in the 1990s – consequences disproportionately experienced by black and brown youth. Produced by Kaari Pitkin Hosted by Kai Wright   Co-published with WNYC Studios. WNYC Studios WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. What happens once we decide a child is a
Episode 2: 'They Look at Me Like a Menace'
WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. In our first episode, we met Z. Z is a kid WNYC Studios Louisa Bertman Episode 2: 'They Look at Me Like a Menace' In our first episode, we met Z. He's locked up because he and a group of friends robbed someone with a gun. But now that he's inside, his biggest problem is his temper. Z is a kid who's had mental health challenges since he was small, and when he's gotten the support he needs, he has thrived. Inside lock up, that support is complicated. It comes with a label. And like many kids in the system, he gets help mostly when he "turns up," which is just the kind of behavior that threatens his chance to go home. Caught is supported, in part, by the Anne Levy Fund, Margaret Neubart Foundation, the John and Gwen Smart Family Foundation, and the Economic Hardship Reporting Project. Produced by Kaari Pitkin Hosted by Kai Wright Co-published with WNYC Studios.
There Went the Neighborhood
TGTN Launch (Richard Yeh) The team behind There Goes the Neighborhood talks about what they've learned throughout the process of making the podcast, and how to move forward in a post-gentrified Brooklyn. Where do we go from here? How do we reconcile with what now seems the inevitability of gentrification not just in Brooklyn, but nationwide? Kai Wright is the Features Editor of The Nation and a reporting fellow of the Investigative Fund at the Nation Institute. Rebecca Carroll is the Producer of Special Projects on Race for WNYC. Karen Frillmann is the Enterprise Editor at WNYC News. Co-published with WNYC Studios and The Nation. This new podcast takes an in-depth look at the gentrification of Brooklyn, and the role race plays in the process. WNYC Studios WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA There Goes the Neighborhood - Episode 9. Co-published with WNYC Studios and
Episode 5: 'The Teenage Brain Is Like a Sports Car'
Louisa Bertman Episode 5: 'The Teenage Brain Is Like a Sports Car' Stephen is one of thousands of so-called "juvenile lifers" who have an unexpected shot at freedom today. Up until 2005, most juveniles could be sentenced just as harshly as adults: that meant life without parole, even the death penalty. Then a landmark Supreme Court decision made executing juvenile offenders illegal, and sentencing guidelines began to change. The court was swayed after hearing about teenage brain development. Caught is supported, in part, by the Anne Levy Fund, Margaret Neubart Foundation, the John and Gwen Smart Family Foundation, and the Economic Hardship Reporting Project. Produced by Kaari Pitkin Hosted by Kai Wright Co-published with WNYC Studios. WNYC Studios WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. Stephen is one of thousands of so-called
Episode 4: 'Oh My God, What Have I Done?'
WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. Honor has struggled for years with leukemia WNYC Studios Louisa Bertman Episode 4: 'Oh My God, What Have I Done?' Honor has struggled for years with leukemia, homelessness and suicide attempts. On the anniversary of his leukemia diagnosis, he reached a breaking point: A terrifying eruption that he still refers to as only "the incident." Like many young people who struggle with mental illness, "the incident" pushed Honor into the criminal justice system. His story -- and his rare shot at a second chance -- challenges our understanding of justice for young people who commit violent crimes. Listen as and he and his family go through weeks of therapy in an effort to keep Honor out of prison. Caught is supported, in part, by the Anne Levy Fund, Margaret Neubart Foundation, the John and Gwen Smart Family Foundation, and the Economic Hardship Reporting Project. Produced by Kaari Pitkin Hosted by Kai Wright Co-published with WNYC Studios.
Birth of the NYC Co-op. Thank You, Finland.
WNYC Studios WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. To understand why cooperative apartments The Alku Toinen, founded by Finns, in Sunset Park. Paige Cowett/WNYC Birth of the NYC Co-op. Thank You, Finland. Unlike other cities in the U.S., cooperative apartments outnumber condos in New York City three to one. To understand why the city has this unique dominance of coops, you have to visit Sunset Park, Brooklyn. The Alku and Alku Toinen are the names of the two buildings that make up the first not-for-profit, housing cooperative in New York City. Located just east of the park, the co-op was established back when this area was known as "Finntown" because of the large Finnish population. Rather than rent in tenement-style buildings, a few of the Finns decided to pool their money to build buildings and set up a housing cooperative called the Finnish Home Building Association. This was 1916, and the idea took off. Ten years later, 25 Finnish coops were established in the area, and the idea spread throughout New York City. This summer, the Alku and Alku Toinen celebrated its 100th birthday (one year late) with a courtyard potluck. The original socialist spirit that inspired the creation of the co-op is still alive to this day. The entertainment for the 100th birthday party of the Finnish Home Building Association. (Paige Cowett/WNYC) Co-published with WNYC Studios.
Does This Avocado Toast Come With A Side of Gentrification?
WNYC Studios WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. Businesses like Avocaderia are creating jobs in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. But at what cost? Park, to an apartment he shares with roommates. Co-published with WNYC Studios.
Episode 9: 'You Just Sit There and Wait for the Next Day to Come'
WNYC Studios WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA Co-published with WNYC Studios. In many counties, pre-trial juvenile
Mouth to Ear
WNYC Studios MULTIMEDIA There Goes the Neighborhood - Episode 1. Co-published with WNYC Studios and WNYC Studios A row of brownstones in Bedford-Stuyvesant. Rents in some Brooklyn neighborhoods have doubled and tripled in recent years. The Nation and WNYC Studios partner for an eight-week series that explains the political and economic process behind gentrification—who wins, who loses, and who gets pushed out. By Kai Wright Joshua Jacobo has lost count of how many places he’s lived in his adult life. He estimates he’s on his 15th room; he’s just turned 29. His family has been in East New York, Brooklyn, since the 1940s, so he’s got roots here. Those connections keep him from becoming homeless. When he’s between rooms or needs to avoid his landlord, he crashes with his grandmother. When he gets evicted, friends and family help find someone willing to put him up for less than $500 a month. There are many reasons for Joshua’s housing churn—he’s got a criminal record; he’s had fights with neighbors. But whatever the particulars, the real issue is that he’s poor, and housing instability is a defining trait of poverty today, as rents have skyrocketed and safety nets have been shredded. Since 2008, over half of poor renters nationwide have spent the majority of their income on housing. This is the crisis that lurks beneath the fights over gentrification. In black and Latino neighborhoods across the country, housing is a deeply contested commodity. Developers targeting young professionals and global investors have sent a surge of capital into places where public and private dollars once fled. Families in these areas that never escaped the recession are now feeling the shove. There Goes the Neighborhood abandons the predictable debates over gentrification and instead examines the political and economic process behind it. Listen each week at TheNation.com, or download it anywhere you get your podcasts. Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes. Kai Wright is the Features Editor of The Nation and a reporting fellow of the Investigative Fund at the Nation Institute. Rebecca Carroll is the Producer of Special Projects on Race for WNYC. Karen Frillmann is the Enterprise Editor at WNYC News. Co-published with WNYC Studios and The Nation. This new podcast takes an in-depth look at the gentrification of Brooklyn, and the role race plays in the process.
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