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At Larkin Street
All photos by Preston Gannaway/GRAIN

At Larkin Street

 

Isabella Black had never heard the word transgender before she arrived in San Francisco. She just knew she didn’t fit in. Not with her family in North Dakota, who embarked on raging benders every weekend. Not with the folks in Bakersfield, where she stepped off a Greyhound alone when she was 15, thinking she had arrived at the California beach, and ended up staying six years. And especially not in her biologically male body. A Google search yielded results for the Larkin Street shelters in San Francisco, where she could get a bed and help going “from boy to girl,” as she put it back then, before she learned the lingo of transitioning. Isabella hopped a bus pointed north.

As computer science and MBA grads flock to the country’s tech capital, a parallel and decades older pilgrimage of gay and transgender youth continues apace. They’re attracted to the ideal of a city where the main thoroughfare is lined with rainbow flags come June, where City Hall started issuing marriage licenses to gay couples more than a decade ago, where Harvey Milk’s image dons something as banal as the foot-roller display at Whole Foods. Yet once here, they find the gay mecca has about as much room for poor gays as it does for poor straights, which is almost none. Milk’s Castro is the province of $12 Mai Tais and $3,500 one bedrooms. The mural reading GIVE ME YOUR TIRED, YOUR POOR, YOUR HUDDLED MASSES on the city’s largest homeless shelter down near SoMa’s drag clubs and gay bars is magical thinking in a neighborhood that also houses Pinterest and Airbnb.

The result is that 29 percent of San Francisco’s homeless identify as LGBTQ — and for homeless under 25 years old, that number creeps up to 48 percent. Statistically, gay homeless differ from the overall homeless population in hopeful ways: They are younger and more likely to be homeless for the first time; they’re less likely to have drug or alcohol addictions or mental-health problems. Mostly they need assistance from people who accept them and don’t threaten to send them back to the parents who kicked them out or the group homes they fled, says Matt Bartek, program manager at Larkin Street Youth Services, the city’s biggest youth shelter. Many of them carry the wounds of social rejection and say that their sexual identity contributed to them being homeless.

Read the full story from California Sunday.

 

Preston Gannaway is a Pulitzer Prize–winning documentary and fine-art photographer. Born and raised in North Carolina, she now lives in Oakland.

Co-published with California Sunday.

Save An Endangered Species: Journalists

Preston Gannaway is a Pulitzer Prize–winning documentary and fine-art photographer. Born and raised in North Carolina, she now lives in Oakland.

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