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Author: Alissa Quart

Alissa Quart is the executive director of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project and the author of the poetry collection Thoughts and Prayers and the nonfiction book Squeezed: Why Our Families Can’t Afford America.

Co-published with SlateSeniors have AARP. Mothers and fathers desperate for child care solutions need a movement just as powerful.

Co-published with The Guardian. Many of the workers risking their lives amid the pandemic are burdened with student debt. We owe them more than just applause.

Co-published with Columbia Journalism Review. We must keep documenting America, even as it fractures into a place that is less and less recognizable.

Co-published with The Chronicle of Philanthropy. Health professionals are donating their time, revealing what’s best about our country’s generous spirit and what’s worst about our ill-prepared …

Co-published with The New York Times. Most American adults don't have enough emergency savings to cover three months of expenses. How will we get through the …

Co-published with The Daily Beast. Online life during quarantine can feel like too much Zooming. Alongside other retro pleasures, the magic talisman of the moment is …

Co-published with the Washington Post. Four new books examine the premise that impoverishment is a moral failing.

Co-published with Slate. Instacart shoppers, Amazon delivery drivers, and others are making it possible for other people to engage in self-protective social distancing.

Co-published with The New York Times. In clear, spare prose, Jeff Madrick lays out a proposal for something akin to a basic income guarantee for parents …

Co-published with The New York Times. Forget big donations. Go for structural reforms.

Co-published with Poetry Magazine. Our executive director Alissa Quart writes on why (and how) we should try more inventive, non-standard ways of presenting the truth, like …

Co-published with The Boston Globe. ‘Grit’ and ‘resilience’ have become buzzwords to praise individual survival skills. But focusing on these traits skew conversations away from equity …

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